Simple Editing | Phone Portrait Photography

I don’t know about you, but I don’t have as much time or space in the photography studio as I used to.

Gone are the days of using a DSLR, desktop/laptop editing, swapping out lenses and dressing a set.

(For now, at least)

As space and time get constricted, and camera phone quality continues to improve, the transition to shooting and editing portraits on a cellphone came naturally.

📷 📱

Editing doesn’t have to be complicated, especially on your phone.

So follow me as I do a quick, routine portrait edit for a flapper-themed boudoir photoshoot, shot and edited on an iPhone 6s.


This is the original, straight out of camera shot.

We’re going to run this through the convenient (and free) Lightroom app so that we have a consistent look throughout the rest of the shoot.

Boost the colors and contrast.

You can see where the backdrop ends and the studio wall is showing, so right in the photo gallery editing section we’re going to use the marker tool to fix that.

For the last step, we’re going to smooth skin, boost select details, and add some blur, reminiscent of a shallower depth of field given by DSLR lenses. For this, I use Facetune.

And here’s the finished portrait, shot and edited on a phone with simple tools.

We can get more complex later, but we don’t need to go all out when we shoot and edit portraits.

📸

When we lack the space, time, and even finances to do shoots with a DSLR,

camera phone photography and self portraits are a great way to make some beautiful work.


What are your favorite editing apps for selfies and portraits?

Would you like a more in depth tutorial on flow and editing apps?

Like and leave a comment!

Simple Editing | Phone Portrait Photography

I don’t know about you, but I don’t have as much time or space in the photography studio as I used to.

Gone are the days of using a DSLR, desktop/laptop editing, swapping out lenses and dressing a set.

(For now, at least)

As space and time get constricted, and camera phone quality continues to improve, the transition to shooting and editing portraits on a cellphone came naturally.

📷 📱

Editing doesn’t have to be complicated, especially on your phone.

So follow me as I do a quick, routine portrait edit for a flapper-themed boudoir photoshoot, shot and edited on an iPhone 6s.


This is the original, straight out of camera shot.

We’re going to run this through the convenient (and free) Lightroom app so that we have a consistent look throughout the rest of the shoot.

Boost the colors and contrast.

You can see where the backdrop ends and the studio wall is showing, so right in the photo gallery editing section we’re going to use the marker tool to fix that.

For the last step, we’re going to smooth skin, boost select details, and add some blur, reminiscent of a shallower depth of field given by DSLR lenses. For this, I use Facetune.

And here’s the finished portrait, shot and edited on a phone with simple tools.

We can get more complex later, but we don’t need to go all out when we shoot and edit portraits.

📸

When we lack the space, time, and even finances to do shoots with a DSLR,

camera phone photography and self portraits are a great way to make some beautiful work.


What are your favorite editing apps for selfies and portraits?

Would you like a more in depth tutorial on flow and editing apps?

Like and leave a comment!

Separated but Integrated|Grunge Floral Portrait

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It’s been a year of growth and change, and as focus in the photography studio shifts and begins to focus more on boudoir portraits, I’m now wondering how separate or integrated I want to keep my businesses.

As photographers and models, we often keep our businesses or at least our portfolios separate.

Lovers of mountain landscapes aren’t necessarily expecting for fine boudoir portraits in the same portfolio and social media feed.

Someone looking to buy fantasy accessories isn’t always looking for NSFW prints.

There is a way to marry many things together, and as business owners and lovers of our craft, it’s important to find our niches.

And perhaps, when we have a couple competing niches, we should get more specific by finding a way to aesthetically marry them together.

What are your thoughts?

How have you built your photography businesses and niches so that you’re able to grow and change? Marry your many niches together?